JeremyNicoll

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Everything posted by JeremyNicoll

  1. "Connection reset by peer" means the computer (ie server) your machine was talking to terminated the connection. It's more likely to mean a problem at the far end, than with your machine (though I have read suggestions that if your machine somehow sends an invalid request to another one, sometimes the other might use this method to stop the conversation). That "invalid request" might have been bad when it left your machine, or it might have got mangled en-route. In practical terms, you probably can't do anything to fix it. But a reboot of your PC, and maybe also your router/modem might help, if only because that may force them to drop and remake their connections into your ISP's network, and in turn that might affect the way your future requests are routed (by your ISP and other networks) to the other end's servers... reducing the possibility that a problem at the other end will recur in exactly the same way at your next attempt.
  2. I've never used Edge but Google tells me that it - as with other browsers - has "development tools". That's to say, things like a "console" and debugger which would normally be used by programmers trying to find out why a page wasn't behaving the way they hoped. If you can find your way to the "console" I'd expect there'd be a way to have it display error messages and you might be able to see something going wrong. On the other hand, some web pages are so poorly written that they generate hundreds of error/warning messages even when they are working perfectly. In Firefox for example there's also a display that shows that when one fetches a webpage, first the browser fetches it itself, then scans through its contents and fetches all the named subsidiary objects (scripts, images, CSS files etc), then scans through those and fetches anything they need, and so on. The display shows a sort of 'tree' of successive requests from the browser to the network, and whether everything requested actually comes back, at all / in a complete form. That can be quite useful if it shows eg that all fetch requests from a particular server, eg for script files, don't work. If you use any sort of ad blocker, or script blocker, you should turn that off for a while as you might be blocking some necessary part of the page logic from being fetched. It's easy to assume that a specific server only supplies scripts you don't want to run, but also block non-malicious necessary scripts from the same place. Similarly, over-aggressive blocking of cookies can make page code not work properly - that (in Edge) if it's controllable at all, might not be controlled via an extension. I just visited the crondall website with Firefox, and I see a "this plugin is old..." warning about Flash at the foot, under the map. Looking at the page source it's clearly ad-related, as it's (on my page view) trying to do something related to ws-eu.amazon-adsystem.com ... MarketPlace=GB ... payless4golf. Very likely the precise details of what each ad needs will vary form person to person, region to region, even between successive attempts to load a page, and not necessarily all of them will attempt to use Flash.
  3. When you talk about "screens" and "settings"... are these for using AFP within a browser? If you are using a browser you probably need to Google for how each one currently controls use of Flash Player. It's going to be no longer supported (by Adobe) anywhere quite soon (by the end of 2020, I think) and browsers have been warning about this and/or defaulting to having it turned off even if it is installed for a while.
  4. > What type...? "Custom Scan". It's the option listed under "malware scan".
  5. The invisibility of the 'Delete' button has been discussed before. You're not the first not to know it's there.
  6. Doesn't selecting a line in the Quarantine listing, then clicking the 'Delete' button (at the foot of the listing) work? The continued questions can also be turned off, at Settings - Advanced - Quarantine re-scan...
  7. Well, that shows 11277 objects (files, maybe other things like registry keys etc) were checked in 262 seconds, which means 43 per second. Here, using Win 8.1 on a 7 year old laptop, (but it does have a core i7, 4-core 8 thread cpu, and two SSDs), an EAM scan, not looking at mail files or archives (so similar choices to your EEK scan) typically scans about 1.5 million objects in about 71 minutes... which means about 350 items per second. Had scans with someone-else's software previously taken 15 minutes? Had those scans examined many more than 11277 files etc?
  8. It's hard to say whether that's a normal speed or a very fast one, without knowing how many objects were checked. And the speed of the hardware, whether you have SSDs, etc. What sort of time did you expect it to take, and why?
  9. But, @GT500 doesn't that exclude from scanning everything inside the selected folder? The OP does not want that.
  10. > This means that a license for two PCs would be even cheaper, right? No. A licence for 1 machine costs so much. A licence for either 2 or 3 costs a different amount. Please note: I am not defending this, just saying: this is the way it works. If you don't like buying "up to 3" machine licences and only using 2 of them, buy 2 separate licences instead.
  11. I think this has been asked before... The price for "3" is already less than twice the price for one machine... so you have to sort of think of it as a slight discount, which would be better if you had 3 machines but it's still cheaper than buying separate licences.
  12. Not unless the logs you attached are /debug/ logs - which you'd have had to enable (at the foot of the list of options in: Settings - Advanced). Maybe, but nobody will be able to tell what went wrong without seeing debug logs (which will show the programmers definitely why EAM thinks what it does). Many bugs don't get fixed (in any application) unless programmers can recreate the issue, or they can see from the logs and traces why the program got it wrong. Of course, the problem might get fixed as a side-effect of aome other change being made in future. That might not be enough. The users who've seen this problem might have systems which share a characteristic that causes the problem.
  13. @stapp Do you have "Automatically quarantine programs with bad reputation" set in Settings - Advanced? (It seems to me that that option doesn't make it clear under what circumstances reputation would be examined. It does say in the tooltip, that this follows an "alert", whereas the log above shows "Notification" actions. Since the difference between "notification" and "alert" is significant, I wonder if that's just loose logging terminology or part of the problem.) I would be most unhappy if anything here got auto-quarantined, since that's more than likely to break applications dependent on files staying put.
  14. @Jakub K. Debug logs are not located in the program files folder but instead in: "C:\ProgramData\Emsisoft\Logs". Ideally you should disable debug logging in due course (or if you want to continue it, disable and immediately re-enable them). Then zip up the files concerned (note that their names show the 'yyyymmdd hhmmss' time when they were first created) and send them to Emsisoft. I usually put the zip in my Dropbox folder and send a private message to GT500 telling him the URL(*). You can also use the EAM GUI to email files to Emsisoft, though that doesn't always work if the files are huge: 1. Click on the little icon in the lower-left (right above the question mark) that looks like little chat bubbles. 2. Click on the button that says Send an email. 3. Select the logs on the right that show today's dates (if you try to send too many logs, then they may not receive them). 4. Fill in the e-mail contact form with your name, your e-mail address, and a description of what the logs are for (ie reference this discussion). You can also attach screenshots etc if needed. 5. Click on Send now at the bottom once you are ready to send the logs. Make sure you don't leave debug-logging on unnecessarily - it creates huge files and could fill your disk up and slow down your machine! * You can send such a message by hovering over his avatar and picking the "Message" option.
  15. > The Ryzen processor in that review... Ah, ok. Thank-you.
  16. Battery-wise, I think it was this review that made me think AMD was more power-hungry: https://uk.pcmag.com/ultrabooks/124866/amd-ryzen-7-vs-intel-core-i7-microsoft-surface-laptop-cpu-face-off
  17. @GT500 Going back to your comment about deferral of updates: " Microsoft generally gives people up to a year and a half before they become mandatory" ... My impression is that what MS do keeps changing, making it quite hard for people to stay on top of terminology changes etc. For example see: https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/windows-it-pro-blog/windows-10-and-the-disappearing-sac-t/ba-p/199747 (I know that's quite an old article) https://www.computerworld.com/article/3447877/the-difference-between-defer-updates-pause-updates-and-delay-updates-and-what-happens-with-win10-19.html (Oct 2019) You also mentioned imaging software - which do you use? Also: AMD cpus... Very very few laptops have them, presumably because they are power hungry, thus worse battery life.
  18. You can revert to an older version (not the immediate past one though, but one that may be a month or two older) by going to Settings - Updates - Update feed, and changing from "Stable" to "Delayed". Once you've altered the setting, do an "Update" and EAM will download and install the older version. Keep the setting at "Delayed" until you are willing to come back to the newest version - as soon as you change the setting back to "Stable" the following "Update" will change the program version.
  19. See: https://support.emsisoft.com/topic/32557-emsisoft-for-imac/?tab=comments#comment-199818
  20. @GT500 said: "I think there's usually someone online in the early morning hours..." In whose timezone? You in the US, us in Europe or what?
  21. @Eddie Timestamps: the "2020-02-14T23:42:35.000Z" looks to me as if it is saying 23:42 Z(ulu) ie GMT, which might well be the same as 10:42 /pm/ in a nearby (or the same) place if there's a one hour difference from GMT in local time. But your "10:42" timestamps show /am/. It would help to know where in the world you are, and where in the world the client pc is.
  22. Well, I tried it, and I did get that question. I expect that's us back to the 'problem' of having File Guard set to 'Thorough'. It's exasperating that behaviour is different then, rather than just appleid more often, IYSWIM.
  23. @GT500 said > Windows 8 isn't supported, and I don't see it listed on any of our product pages. Oops. Sorry, yes you're right. > It's actually dangerous to run Windows without the latest updates installed, and I don't recommend waiting to install them Waiting a few days is a trade-off between being fairly prompt to install them and trying to avoid the ones that are 'bad', of which there are lots. In my experience waiting until the weekend after a Patch Tuesday is usually long enough for MS to have withdrawn the bad updates, or refined the code that decides whether or not to install them, or at the very least, updated their info pages to tell people what problems they shoudl expect and - sometimes - how to work around them. My attitudes are shaped by my previous professional life, researching and applying fixes on S/390 systems. With Wndows, back in the XP days I read all the info about each KB that MS released before deciding whether to install it. Nowadays there's a lot less info available from MS unfortunately, but I still read what they do produce. > The only important recommendation I have right now is get something with an AMD processor, as Intel is having too many security issues. Noted.
  24. For anyone reading this, who doesn't know who "which.co.uk" are ... it's a long-standing consumer affairs organisation (known just as 'Which?') - which in the days before the internet did product and service testing which consumers could read about (if they subscribed). They still do so, but it's less necessary with online reviews of stuff easily found. On the other hand, as a formal product testing organisation they don't have the problem of "fake reviews" that plague online sites. They also offer compting and legal support to their members. Most cities used also to have a local "consumer groups" who tested and reported on (and pressured councils etc to improve) local services and also local branches of national shopping chains etc. There was (is?) also a National Consumer Federation which acted as a sort of clearing-house for the local groups.
  25. @GT500 said "It's possible ... debug logs...." Well, I did send them.