Franco C

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About Franco C

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  1. The server I own was recently infiltrated with the .nampohyu ransomware. I have a Synology Diskstation that I use to store my DVD and Bluray collection, consisting mostly of direct backups of my collection (for DVDs it's file folders each containing the .VOB files and .IFO files for each individual movie. For Blurays, its a folder for each movie that contains either an .ISO file of the disc or BDMV and CERTIFICATE folders for each individual movie). The files on my Diskstation are not 'encrypted' even though the ransom note would have you believe that. While I could physically wipe the server and re-load all my movies (they are in boxes in my basement), I've discovered a time-consuming solution for myself: For the DVDs, each movie was saved in an individual folder containing the AUDIO_TS and VIDEO_TS folders from the DVD. In the folders are the .VOB files, .IFO files and .BUP files. I used command prompts to bulk remove the .nampohyu extensions from the .VOB files. I found that the existing .IFO files were corrupted so I deleted them and renamed the accompanying .BUP files as .IFO files. This restored the functionality of the DVDs. For the Blu-Rays, the ones that were saved as .ISO files, it seems that the .nampohyu ransomware corrupted the header in the .ISO file. I used the command prompt line to bulk delete the .nampohyu extensions on the files. Then I purchased a program called IsoBuster, loaded the .ISO file of the movie into it, then extracted the BDMV, CERTIFICATE and whatever other files were in the .ISO file into another folder. I'm assuming this got rid of the corrupted header in the original .ISO file because it brought the Bluray back to life. It is a tedious process to do this for all my movies but at least I didn't lose my collection and be d***ed if I am going to pay some thief to return to me what id rightfully mine. Hope this information helps.
  2. The server I own was recently infiltrated with the .nampohyu ransomware. I have a Synology Diskstation that I use to store my DVD and Bluray collection, consisting mostly of direct backups of my collection (for DVDs it's file folders each containing the .VOB files and .IFO files for each individual movie. For Blurays, its a folder for each movie that contains either an .ISO file of the disc or BDMV and CERTIFICATE folders for each individual movie). The files on my Diskstation are not 'encrypted' even though the ransom note would have you believe that. While I could physically wipe the server and re-load all my movies (they are in boxes in my basement), I've discovered a time-consuming solution for myself: For the DVDs, each movie was saved in an individual folder containing the AUDIO_TS and VIDEO_TS folders from the DVD. In the folders are the .VOB files, .IFO files and .BUP files. I used command prompts to bulk remove the .nampohyu extensions from the .VOB files. I found that the existing .IFO files were corrupted so I deleted them and renamed the accompanying .BUP files as .IFO files. This restored the functionality of the DVDs. For the Blu-Rays, the ones that were saved as .ISO files, it seems that the .nampohyu ransomware corrupted the header in the .ISO file. I used the command prompt line to bulk delete the .nampohyu extensions on the files. Then I purchased a program called IsoBuster, loaded the .ISO file of the movie into it, then extracted the BDMV, CERTIFICATE and whatever other files were in the .ISO file into another folder. I'm assuming this got rid of the corrupted header in the original .ISO file because it brought the Bluray back to life. It is a tedious process to do this for all my movies but at least I didn't lose my collection and be damned if I am going to pay some thief to return to me what id rightfully mine. Hope this information helps.