KathyJ

Should I purchase a router too?

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I am one of the rare ones that doesn't have a router and never have. I use a Westell modem that I have owned for many years and have never wanted or needed one and I still don't. I use Windows 7 Pro and EIS and I've never had any problems. I don't want to purchase a router when I don't really need it and can get by without it, so will using Windows firewall with advanced security and EAM be sufficient?  I apologize for having to ask this again. I had asked it in the  EIS  Internet Security forum but someone caused my thread to be closed before I could get an answer. Yes, my modem is old but the speed is fine with it and I've never had any security problems without a router before when I was using EIS, etc. Will Windows firewall using advanced settings, EAM and Malwarebytes Premium be as good as EIS and NOT using a router? It never failed me.

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While routers today do not have the best logging, I have owned routers in the past that have had great logging. You would not believe the garbage a router can block.

Having the NAT , is a very good way to block incoming problems before a software firewall  has to deal with them. Most interfaces from  internet providers today also include a router .

Over the years I have advised people I know to use a router if they only have a modem. There are many routers on the market that do a great job, so picking one is

a problem. Right now I use a Comcast interface with both and will be looking to purchase a modem and a router. Not only for rental price, but also to have a better router 

that I can program with what I think is better than their default settings.

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Bear in mind that if you use a laptop, then if you're out of the house and connect to a public network you no longer have the protection of your router.  Yes, such a network probably also has a router, but you don't know anything about how it is configured and can't trust what's going on on that network.    If you're going to use a machine in public a lot, then arguably it might be better to treat the home LAN (if you have one) as a hostile place too (and bear in mind that if you have visitors or kids, and their friends, and friends of friends use your LAN then - unless you've configured what they can do  - your LAN isn't really safe any longer) and learn how to configure each machine's software firewall for maximum safety.  You can't do that without understanding lots more about types of internet traffic than most people are willing to learn.

In my experience routers can be very hard to understand - lousy or non-existent manuals, translated from the chinese...   Then there's buggy configuration software and slow or non-existent support from a manufacturer.  Of course there are some which can have open-source firmware installed to replace the manufacturer's firmware, and I assume for those there will at least be a community with a forum where people can get advice... but it's likely to be very geeky.    

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Stop trying to make a simple answer complicated. Routers do work and work very well even with default programming and manuals are there to help. Of course

experience is needed for advanced programming, but not really needed these days. ROUTERS WORK WELL OUT OF THE BOX !!

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If you use DSL there is some programming to do. ISP username and password which you get from your carrier. Not sure with cable at the moment as I am still researching a modem and router to purchase.

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I use a desktop and I am the only one that uses this computer and modem. I've gotten by all of these years without a router but I understand that things change and I may need one just for the security. If I do, I will purchase it but if I will have the same amount of protection as I did with EIS without a router, I would rather not.

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What kind of modem do you have? Many modems these days (especially DSL modems) have built-in routers.

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KathyJ - a router protects you mainly against threats coming from the outside... and the Windows Firewall will do that too.   Not having a router will mean that many more attempts to get at your pc will arrive there from the outside... and that will mean the Windows Firewall will be be busier rejecting that traffic than if you had a NAT router preventing much of that traffic from ever reaching your pc.  Having a router does mean that - if there happen to be bugs in the Windows Firewall, or a misjudged rule in place, you have a separate first line of defence.

 

The Windows Firewall - as configured by default by Microsoft - lets in quite a lot of internet traffic that might be needed to make various bits of Windows work.  There's an option somewhere in its config that sets the default rules, and if you look at them you'll see rules allowing lots of things.    Eg, there's a rule (on my W8.1 system) to allow a KIndle MetroApp to do something or other.  I expect I'll disable that rule because I have no interest in what that app does, and likewise I'll disable a lot of others, but cautiously.  Ones that are clearly to do with letting Windows work need to stay enabled, unless I'm certain that they support features I don't use.  I expect that I'll have to google to find that out... an ongoing process of self-education.    

In a lot of ways though I'm more concerned with defining rules to prevent arbitrary applications from initiating network traffic.  I know the EAM behaviour blocker will prevent what it regards as iffy apps from doing that, but as far as I understand this, I don't think the BB blocks internet traffic being sent by 'trusted apps'.  But I might want to stop that for apps that I don't think should be running here, just in case they run unexpectedly.  Or, I might want to limit the type of traffic they send.

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41 minutes ago, GT500 said:

What kind of modem do you have? Many modems these days (especially DSL modems) have built-in routers.

It is a Westell WireSpeed. It has modem/router on the bottom of it but it is old but it still works great though and this is what I've been using all of this time and it has worked.

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Hmm, I see a Kathy asking similar questions at: https://forums.att.com/t5/AT-T-Internet-Equipment/Westell-Wirespeed-modem-routers/td-p/5254445

Googling for the part numbers, there's a little ambiguity unfortunately.  Some model -2100s are just modems, but some sites refer to them as routers as well.  The 2200s seem to be modem/routers. At least one supplier - BellSouth - according to: http://www.dslreports.com/faq/6096 supplied Westell modems which didn't have built-in routers (firewalls, it says on that page) even though the normal 'retail' model did.

But if your modem actually says 'router' on it, I find it hard to believe that it wouldn't have a router in it.   Logging in to it (if you can) is probably the easiest way to find out if it does offer router facilities.  The dslreports webpage mentioned above has screenshots (on links at the foot of the page) showing what some of the configuration screens on such a modem/router are like.  On the other hand there's a suggestion much higher on that page that IE7 doesn't work for logging in to them - hopefully a modern browser will work though... but read the info on the link about that.

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13 hours ago, JeremyNicoll said:

Hmm, I see a Kathy asking similar questions at: https://forums.att.com/t5/AT-T-Internet-Equipment/Westell-Wirespeed-modem-routers/td-p/5254445

Googling for the part numbers, there's a little ambiguity unfortunately.  Some model -2100s are just modems, but some sites refer to them as routers as well.  The 2200s seem to be modem/routers. At least one supplier - BellSouth - according to: http://www.dslreports.com/faq/6096 supplied Westell modems which didn't have built-in routers (firewalls, it says on that page) even though the normal 'retail' model did.

But if your modem actually says 'router' on it, I find it hard to believe that it wouldn't have a router in it.   Logging in to it (if you can) is probably the easiest way to find out if it does offer router facilities.  The dslreports webpage mentioned above has screenshots (on links at the foot of the page) showing what some of the configuration screens on such a modem/router are like.  On the other hand there's a suggestion much higher on that page that IE7 doesn't work for logging in to them - hopefully a modern browser will work though... but read the info on the link about that.

The thread you found at AT&T is me and as you can see, I never received an answer. I have 3. The one I'm using right now is model A90-210030-04 which says on the bottom of it DSL Router. Then I have B90-220030-04 which also has DSL Router on it. But this is when it gets confusing. I also have another one with the model #A90-210030-04 but it only says modem on the back but the one I'm using with the same model number has router on the back of it. I logged in to it but either I don't recognize what I'm seeing as a router or else it's just a modem. What would I see if it is a router? If anyone can figure this out I sure would appreciate it. I hate to purchase a router if I don't need it and then find out I have a router here.

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Did you buy these in person, or were they sent to you by your ISP?   As I said, that webpage says that some non-retail Westell modems were shipped (by ISPs) without the same electronics in them as the shop-bought ones.   There's only two ways to find out what your units actually are - one would be to look at the documentation that came with them, or contact the ISP that sent them to you. Failing that, you'd need to point a browser at the modem/router and log in to it and then cautiously explore its configuration screens to see what it offers.   To do that you're going to have to know the modem/router's userid and password - they might be defaults or they might be specific to you (ie set by your ISP).   They might even be printed on a label on the underneath of the unit (which of course is not at all secure), and if they are there, you should have changed them as soon as you got the unit - only you will know if actually did that.

 

 

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1 minute ago, JeremyNicoll said:

Did you buy these in person, or were they sent to you by your ISP?   As I said, that webpage says that some non-retail Westell modems were shipped (by ISPs) without the same electronics in them as the shop-bought ones.   There's only two ways to find out what your units actually are - one would be to look at the documentation that came with them, or contact the ISP that sent them to you. Failing that, you'd need to point a browser at the modem/router and log in to it and then cautiously explore its configuration screens to see what it offers.   To do that you're going to have to know the modem/router's userid and password - they might be defaults or they might be specific to you (ie set by your ISP).   They might even be printed on a label on the underneath of the unit (which of course is not at all secure), and if they are there, you should have changed them as soon as you got the unit - only you will know if actually did that.

 

 

There were provided by my internet service provider. I have logged in and changed the userid and password several times so that is no problem. I just don't know what to look for to determine if one of these is just a modem or a modem/router.

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> I just don't know what to look for to determine if one of these is just a modem or a modem/router.

On that dslreports webpage there are screenshots of what the admin pages of the modem/router may look like.  I think that you need to browse through those and see which look familiar - as it says the screens you might see might not exactly match those on that webpage.  In 'Expert mode' in particular I'd be looking for anything to do with NAT.  NAT will not feature unless you have a router. 

There's also something called 'IP passthrough' which I think would only be available if you have a router (it's for deliberately allowing traffic from outside your lan to reach a single designated lan pc). 

It's NAT that matters. 

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That is a router setting. While it may have other settings that could be changed, it looks like it is doing it's job with NAT. Just leave it alone.

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2 minutes ago, Ken1943 said:

That is a router setting. While it may have other settings that could be changed, it looks like it is doing it's job with NAT. Just leave it alone.

That is the best news I've heard!!!!! Thank you so much!!!! You have made my day and I promise you, I will not bother anything!!!! Thank you again!!!!!

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Hmm, I'm not sure.   You don't need to set up either of the NAT 'port forwarding' options, and I suspect the 'static nat address' may be the same as the 'ip passthrough' thing I described earlier (also known as a DMZ in some firewalls).   Hmm, google suggests it's very similar but offers a little more control - 'static nat' is also for controlling incoming traffic that you want to direct to a particular PC on the LAN.  Nothing you've said suggests to me that you need 'port forwarding', or 'static nat' or 'ip passthrough'.

But the second screenshot shows zero counts for everything in the 'firewall status' field, and I think I'd have expected to see non-zero values.

Do any of the displays tell you the firmware level of the software in this modem/router?   It may be that it's ancient and maybe there's a bug there.

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10 minutes ago, JeremyNicoll said:

Hmm, I'm not sure.   You don't need to set up either of the NAT 'port forwarding' options, and I suspect the 'static nat address' may be the same as the 'ip passthrough' thing I described earlier (also known as a DMZ in some firewalls).   Hmm, google suggests it's very similar but offers a little more control - 'static nat' is also for controlling incoming traffic that you want to direct to a particular PC on the LAN.  Nothing you've said suggests to me that you need 'port forwarding', or 'static nat' or 'ip passthrough'.

But the second screenshot shows zero counts for everything in the 'firewall status' field, and I think I'd have expected to see non-zero values.

Do any of the displays tell you the firmware level of the software in this modem/router?   It may be that it's ancient and maybe there's a bug there.

I haven't been able to find the firmware version but it does say the software version is: Current Software Version: VER:01.00.17. Unless this is different, firmware and software versions used to be 2 different things. I am using Windows firewall with advanced settings and EAM also. Maybe with all of them put together, it should be enough? It's worked all of these years with other firewalls,  EIS and Online Armor. 

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I've just found copies of manuals for Westell 2100 and 2200 online.  I need to have a look at them to see if they give any clues.  These will be for the standard 'retail' models, which might not be the same as your ones.  I found the manuals at:

for the 2100 - https://manualsbrain.com/en/manuals/934657/download/       and the 2200 - https://manualsbrain.com/en/manuals/1215601/download/

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10 minutes ago, JeremyNicoll said:

I've just found copies of manuals for Westell 2100 and 2200 online.  I need to have a look at them to see if they give any clues.  These will be for the standard 'retail' models, which might not be the same as your ones.  I found the manuals at:

for the 2100 - https://manualsbrain.com/en/manuals/934657/download/       and the 2200 - https://manualsbrain.com/en/manuals/1215601/download/

Ok. I've downloaded them so I will look at them too. 

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That firmware version number matches what I see in one screenshot here: http://www.dslreports.com/faq/5421     but it's impossible to tell from that page whether this is old or not because I don't know how the number works.   If it reads from left to right then 1.00.something is probably the original... but if the trailing digits happen to be a year number your one ending in 17 might be recent.

And, as that page points out, firmware for versions of Westell modems/router made for specific ISPs are all different.  If you were to load the wrong ISP-specific firmware into the thing it would probably stop it working.    I think you should ask your ISP whether or not the specific unit or indeed all of them can have their firmware updated and if so, ask them where you'd get that from.  It might be available from one of their servers.   You also need to ask them if firewall status counts of zero are a bug or not.   And, if it's not a bug, is there some option somewhere in the configuration that would turn on the firewall if it's not already on?

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6 minutes ago, JeremyNicoll said:

That firmware version number matches what I see in one screenshot here: http://www.dslreports.com/faq/5421     but it's impossible to tell from that page whether this is old or not because I don't know how the number works.   If it reads from left to right then 1.00.something is probably the original... but if the trailing digits happen to be a year number your one ending in 17 might be recent.

And, as that page points out, firmware for versions of Westell modems/router made for specific ISPs are all different.  If you were to load the wrong ISP-specific firmware into the thing it would probably stop it working.    I think you should ask your ISP whether or not the specific unit or indeed all of them can have their firmware updated and if so, ask them where you'd get that from.  It might be available from one of their servers.   You also need to ask them if firewall status counts of zero are a bug or not.   And, if it's not a bug, is there some option somewhere in the configuration that would turn on the firewall if it's not already on?

That would be a problem if I have to contact AT&T. I hate just the thoughts of doing that and then they won't help me but try to sell me another modem/router. I know this for a fact because they have tried it before and I told them, I didn't need a new one because I have 3 that work fine and obviously, I didn't purchase a new one. They wouldn't tell me a thing because they would lose a sell if they helped me with this one. I guess you and many others have figured out I'm from the "ole school" that says, "if it ain't broke don't fix it". These days the way they make everything, these that I already have will probably outlast a new one if I purchased one today. I appreciate all of your help, your time and patience with me. Thank you very much!!!!

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Do AT&T have a users' forum?   Or, are there independent forums where AT&T users hang out?   

If it ain't broke don't fix it.... on the whole I agree, but (as I said in your first thread on the EIS forum) older modem/routers sometimes just can't cope with a modern internet connection's speed.  I used to use a privately bought router/firewall here - on a cable connection laid originally by a cable tv company - and there came a time when the ISP's connection speed was far higher than my old router could run at.  At the same time the ISP's 'free' modem/router was getting bad reviews on the ISP's own forum, for flakey firewall software.  But it was possible to turn off its firewall/router features and just use it as a modem.  So I bought a new router/firewall, and use the ISP's box just as a modem.    That's at my house, but I also use a connection from the same ISP at my mother's house, and there I have a more recent model of the ISP-supplied modem/router... and it has mainly been fine -it needs rebooted more often than I like, but it basically works ok.  But I've still had, I think, three separate modem/routers provided by that ISP at my house, and two at mum's house.  Each one has been capable of higher speeds than the older one.     

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Hmm, that screenshot up above suggests your connection runs at 1536 K bits/sec, which is about 1.5 Mbps.  That's a great deal slower than the connection I have here - albeit in a city - and also bearing in mind that DSL on a phone cable in the UK would be fairly slow too.   Do you know if AT&T expect only to provide that speed to you, or should it be significantly higher?

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Here's another website with screenshots that look more like the one you showed (so maybe more similar firmware).  http://www.brandx.net/support/dsl/westell6100/westell-2100-6100.html

It might be worth looking at all the screens your box has.  Don't change anything!   In fact, if you've not already done so I'd seriously suggest you write down, or take screenshots of, every single config page.  If you ever accidently reset the box to its defaults, and don't know what every page is meant to be set to, you'll have an even bigger problem.

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35 minutes ago, JeremyNicoll said:

Here's another website with screenshots that look more like the one you showed (so maybe more similar firmware).  http://www.brandx.net/support/dsl/westell6100/westell-2100-6100.html

It might be worth looking at all the screens your box has.  Don't change anything!   In fact, if you've not already done so I'd seriously suggest you write down, or take screenshots of, every single config page.  If you ever accidently reset the box to its defaults, and don't know what every page is meant to be set to, you'll have an even bigger problem.

I'm satisfied with the speed it is now. I have a fast assess account and the speed this modem/router does is fine with me. I've been with them so long, I don't remember what speed I'm suppose to get. Yes, AT&T has a user forum. That is where I had asked this question before was the AT&T forum.  https://forums.att.com/t5/AT-T-Internet-Equipment/Westell-Wirespeed-modem-routers/td-p/5254445 and got no replies. I have no complaints. I just wanted to make sure I would have enough protection using EAM & Microsoft firewall instead of another software firewall.  I went back into the modem settings and it has a backup/restore menu so I backed up the configuration for it but I will also do as you suggested and take screen shots of them and save them.  

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8 hours ago, KathyJ said:

There were provided by my internet service provider. I have logged in and changed the userid and password several times so that is no problem. I just don't know what to look for to determine if one of these is just a modem or a modem/router.

If there are settings in the router for remote management (HTTP/HTTPS), remote telnet, and/or remote SSH then I would recommend turning those off as well. I also recommend turning off UPnP, as it allows reconfiguring too many settings on your router that make it easy for infections on computers connected to your router to hijack it.

As long as those security considerations are taken into account, and your ISP updates the firmware periodically, then you should be OK.

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7 minutes ago, GT500 said:

If there are settings in the router for remote management (HTTP/HTTPS), remote telnet, and/or remote SSH then I would recommend turning those off as well. I also recommend turning off UPnP, as it allows reconfiguring too many settings on your router that make it easy for infections on computers connected to your router to hijack it.

As long as those security considerations are taken into account, and your ISP updates the firmware periodically, then you should be OK.

I went back and checked and didn't see any of those settings you recommended for me to turn off. As for the ISP updating the firmware, if they do, I don't know it because I haven't had to reset or do anything that concerned the router/modem. But, it's worked all of these years without giving me problems so maybe it will continue with Microsoft firewall and EAM installed. Thanks for your help!

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Sounds like you are in one of those areas where upgrading speed will almost never happen. I think you should just leave everything alone and continue 

and just use your smarts to not get infected. I got a ransomware at a few months ago. Opened an email that was almost exactly what I was expecting. I do drive 

images about once a month so I just installed an image. Smart web browsing is very important these days. After all, MAJOR companies don't do better than we do !

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27 minutes ago, KathyJ said:

I went back and checked and didn't see any of those settings you recommended for me to turn off. As for the ISP updating the firmware, if they do, I don't know it because I haven't had to reset or do anything that concerned the router/modem. But, it's worked all of these years without giving me problems so maybe it will continue with Microsoft firewall and EAM installed. Thanks for your help!

You can try calling your ISP and asking them if the router firmware gets upgraded periodically, or if they have newer routers that they can send you. Sometimes ISP's will send out new routers every so many years that support newer technologies and faster speeds, although it really depends on the ISP and whether or not they feel like doing this.

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10 hours ago, KathyJ said:

I went back and checked and didn't see any of those settings you recommended for me to turn off. As for the ISP updating the firmware, if they do, I don't know it because I haven't had to reset or do anything that concerned the router/modem. But, it's worked all of these years without giving me problems so maybe it will continue with Microsoft firewall and EAM installed. Thanks for your help!

Hang on... right at the start you told us that you were using a modem, rather than a modem/router, and have been doing so for ages.    But in your original thread on the EIS forum:

you strongly implied that you only recently swapped-out the modem and replaced it with a thing that you think is probably also a router.    So the latter box has not "worked all these years without problems" - it's only been is use for a month... if it's the things you're using now.  Could you clarify which item you're using now?  

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@GT500- can you check whether what I've written here is correct, please?

OK, I've now skimmed through the manuals for 'retail' versions of the Westell 2100 and 2200 boxes.  As I've said before there's no way to tell - without talking to the technical support staff at the supplying ISP - if the units you have have the same features or not.

The zero counts (shown in your earlier screenshot) worry me.  Do they change if you log in to the router in the midst of using it to browse a website? 

 

I think there's a problem.  These days if you buy a NAT-capable router, you get something which 'just works'.  It performs what's described here (in paragraph 2):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_address_translation

as "IP masquerading".  That is, any IP traffic originating from any PC on your LAN (each of which have different internal LAN IP addresses) is changed as it passes through the router to the outside world.  All the traffic goes out into the internet with instead the IP address of the router (as seen from the internet) on it instead of the address(es) the PCs have on the LAN.  When replies come back to the router it changes them again so they contain internal LAN addresses and sends them to the right PC on the internal network.    On a modern router this all just works, and it's only in exceptional circumstances that someone would need to add extra configuration rules to their router to allow unsolicited incoming traffic (ie not replies to requests your PCs have sent out to the wider world) to pass on in to the LAN, and the rules would have to direct that traffic to whichever PC is expected to handle it.

But quite a few years ago, things were more complicated.  I think that your box, even if it does have a NAT function, has something less sophisticated.  In the 2100 manual, on p 67, describing the firewall configuration screen, it says that the FW only controls outbound traffic and inbound traffic must be configured within the NAT port forwarding dialogs.  In an appendix on p 108 it lists the details of ports that each of many different services would require opened.  I think that your router might not have the automatic "it just works" kind of NAT, but requires manual configuration of the sorts of incoming traffic that will be allowed in.  [There's discussion on http://www.brandx.net/support/dsl/westell6100/westell-2100-6100.html  about how people might turn off the routing functions on such a box turning even a combined modem/router into just a modem (and implicitly by reversing those actions how you might enable it).  That page advises a quick way to enable routing - by resetting the box - but if you do that you need before you do a reset to know ALL the values that will need to be redefined in the modem configuration pages.] 

Page 67 of the 2100 manual (and p 78 of the 2200 manual) describe the configuration page of the boxes which dictate the level of firewall (outbound traffic control) that the boxes perform.  What's that set to on your box?  There's also a firewall log (2100: p 79; 2200 p 90) described - does it have any contents?

Also, in both manuals in the section on 'self test' (which are utilities that the router can use to test stuff further out on the internet) there's a PING option described.  It checks connections between the router and computers further out on the wider world.   In the 2200's manual there's an extra explanation on p98, omitted from the 2100's manual, that clarifies that this is not the same thing as PING executed from a command window on the PC... and that you would expect a PING from the PC's command window not to work if the firewall is properly blocking some kinds of traffic (assuming the firewall's level of security is set at the recommended level).  So... trying a ping from a command window on the PC will tell you if the router's firewall is blocking traffic or not (I'm sure it applies to the 2100 and 2200, but the clarification wasn't in the 2100's manual).   Open a command window on your PC (Windows key R and then type in cmd.exe) then choose the command-prompt window (or get it some other way if you're most used to that).  Type in:  ping bbc.co.uk      and press Enter.   If it works you'll see something like

C:\Windows\system32>ping bbc.co.uk

Pinging bbc.co.uk [212.58.246.79] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 212.58.246.79: bytes=32 time=31ms TTL=55
Reply from 212.58.246.79: bytes=32 time=27ms TTL=55
Reply from 212.58.246.79: bytes=32 time=30ms TTL=55
Reply from 212.58.246.79: bytes=32 time=24ms TTL=55

Ping statistics for 212.58.246.79:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 24ms, Maximum = 31ms, Average = 28ms

C:\Windows\system32>

The numbers may well be different for you... but you should see four lines of reply and a summary of what the test showed... if it worked.   If it doesn't you'll see no replies and various other messages.

If the ping works it means the firewall isn't blocking outbound traffic, and either it isn't turned on, or it's been set to a low level of security. 

 

I am not sure how to tell if enough NAT is happening to protect you.

 

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12 hours ago, JeremyNicoll said:

Hang on... right at the start you told us that you were using a modem, rather than a modem/router, and have been doing so for ages.    But in your original thread on the EIS forum:

you strongly implied that you only recently swapped-out the modem and replaced it with a thing that you think is probably also a router.    So the latter box has not "worked all these years without problems" - it's only been is use for a month... if it's the things you're using now.  Could you clarify which item you're using now?  

At the time I posted the thread in EIS, I thought it was just a modem because that's how it is labeled on the bottom of it. But, I have another one with the same model # but it is labeled modem/router so I pulled it out and started using it instead. I just figured it should do as well as the modem did all of these years but I could be wrong. 

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13 hours ago, GT500 said:

You can try calling your ISP and asking them if the router firmware gets upgraded periodically, or if they have newer routers that they can send you. Sometimes ISP's will send out new routers every so many years that support newer technologies and faster speeds, although it really depends on the ISP and whether or not they feel like doing this.

I would rather just go out and purchase one myself rather than having to deal with AT&T. I've had to do that before and that was when I said, "Never again!". Lesson learned the hard way.

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11 hours ago, JeremyNicoll said:

The zero counts (shown in your earlier screenshot) worry me.  Do they change if you log in to the router in the midst of using it to browse a website?

It's possible that the router isn't keeping accurate statistics (or isn't keeping them at all for the firewall/NAT), and it's possible that the firewall isn't even on. A firewall port test like the ShieldsUp! test from GRC would indicate if ports are open, so that you at least know if the router/modem is offering any protection.

This is what my router scores in the test (if you post screenshots of the test results, be sure to censor the IP address like I did):

image.png
Download Image

 

Now, one thing that Steve Gibson doesn't seem to account for (at least in his description of the results of the test) is that while Windows systems use ICMP packets for pings, Linux/Unix systems do not use ICMP packets for that by default. Most Linux (and I would believe most other Unix-based Operating Systems) use UDP packets for pings instead, with the option to use TCP or ICMP packets for pings. A probe would normally not be done exclusively using one type of packet either (for instance I would believe that nmap uses various types of TCP, UDP, and ICMP packets during its probes to increase the chances of getting replies that would reveal information about the system being probed).

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