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Hexadecimal ip


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7 minutes ago, Elise said:

Without seeing an example, this usually happens when ipv6 is used and not ipv4. If that is the case its perfectly normal. You can look up what the IP belongs to just as you can do with a "normal" ipv4 address on whois sites.

Ok ,I thought I might have to convert it first.

How can you tell if it is ipv4 or ipv6? This stuff is a little over my head.

I need to do some more research.

Thanks Elise! 

I think I got ...just ipv6 uses hexadecimal?

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Yes, to put it simple: with ipv6 you have a larger pool of possible IP addresses than with ipv4. This is necessary because there are so many devices worldwide that request an IP address on the internet that the total amount of possible ipv4 addresses is simply not enough. You can read more about it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv6

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45 minutes ago, Elise said:

Yes, to put it simple: with ipv6 you have a larger pool of possible IP addresses than with ipv4. This is necessary because there are so many devices worldwide that request an IP address on the internet that the total amount of possible ipv4 addresses is simply not enough. You can read more about it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv6

I see,I will check out the link.

Customer service here is top notch!

Thanks again Elise

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6 hours ago, Elise said:

If you'd like to know what they belong to you can just copy/paste them here. If you'd rather not post them in a public forum, feel free to send me a PM.

I'm not really concerned about a particular ip, just trying to understand this a little.

Why are there so many source/ dest ip's? There are like 50 in a couple minutes.

Are all these actual internet addresses?

I don't know how you people can figure all this out.

This is why I have EAM installed:D

Thanks Elise

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This is normal. First of all there's your browser. Each page you visit has a corresponding IP. Next think about Windows and other software checking for updates on a regular basis. On top of that email clients and the like will check for new messages as well. Then there are all kind of communication applications (skype, facebook messenger, and so on and so forth) that all will connect to a number of IPs to retrieve (or check for) messages. 

Think also about Microsoft's time synchronization and for example all kind of software license checks.

These are just a few examples, but I think you can imagine why you'd always see a list of IP addresses your computer connects to/receives data from. :)

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