Jump to content

Windows Defender not Disabled (cont'd)


emwul64
 Share

Recommended Posts

Up front: there has been an earlier thread with the same title (dec.7, TS: aussiekendoll).
However, I do not want to 'hijack' that thread, also because there was no follow up there.

Am facing the same issue though. Assumed that EAM would have disabled Windows Defender?
I found a thread on the Microsoft forum How to disable Windows Defender in Windows 10
that offers a solution using gpedit.msc, Powershell and/or registry stuff, but honestly, I know people that never heard of such things...

That aside, whilst writing this, I just realize ... (and still need to figure out) 
Maybe this is the reason why an autohotkey shortcut in the startup folder doesn't launch. Have endlessly been puzzling and trying.

For the time being, I'll try do disable Windows defender using gpedit.

 


 

SnagIt-22012018 065540.png

SnagIt-22012018 073148.png

 

Later..

Questions:
should I also add path D:\AutoHotkey\AutoHotkey.exe in the 'Scanning' box ?
and
should I also add the autohotkey shortcut in C:\..\..\startup folder to both above boxes?

5a658aad8f6c4_SnagIt-22012018074728.png.d8ee9bb8a3a91f6b32bdff80f9462893.png

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> Maybe this is the reason why an autohotkey shortcut in the startup folder doesn't launch. Have endlessly been puzzling and trying.

Are you sure it doesn't launch?  Or is there a possibility that it launches and (for some reason) stops immediately?

What happens if you navigate to your startup folder and double-click the shortcut?

If that works, look in the Eventlogs (I don't know where they are in Win10) and see how whether AHK's startup is recorded.  Look back in the eventlogs for anything similar at the time you logged on - maybe they'll show AHK start (and stop) or an attempt to start it.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, emwul64 said:

Assumed that EAM would have disabled Windows Defender?

Windows is responsible for managing Windows Defender. We don't touch it, and neither should any other anti-virus software.

Also note that in an update to Windows 10 (either the Creators Update or the Anniversary Update) Microsoft changed the behavior of Windows Defender so that it was no longer automatically disabled, but instead when a third-party anti-virus was installed and its protection was turned on then Windows Defender's protection would be turned off, and when the third-party anti-virus protection is turned off Windows Defender's protection would be turned back on. Likewise, if you turn on Windows Defender, it should turn off the third party anti-virus, and if you turn the third party anti-virus back on it should turn off Windows Defender's protection.

 

14 hours ago, emwul64 said:

that offers a solution using gpedit.msc, Powershell and/or registry stuff, but honestly, I know people that never heard of such things...

Microsoft actually intends that Windows Defender never be disabled on Windows 10, so they made doing so rather complicated. I've heard reports that Windows Update may re-enable Windows Defender as well, so it may not even be possible to permanently disable it anymore.

 

14 hours ago, emwul64 said:

should I also add path D:\AutoHotkey\AutoHotkey.exe in the 'Scanning' box ?

Yes, excluding from both Scanning and Monitoring is recommended when troubleshooting compatibility issues. Excluding from Monitoring only is useful when the Behavior Blocker is blocking something you don't want it to, however if there is no noticeable action from the Behavior Blocker and/or no logged actions from the Behavior Blocker then it is best to assume it is a compatibility issue and add exclusions for both Scanning and Monitoring.

 

14 hours ago, emwul64 said:

should I also add the autohotkey shortcut in C:\..\..\startup folder to both above boxes?

If you try to add a shortcut to the exclusions, Emsisoft Anti-Malware will add the program the shortcut points to rather than the shortcut itself.

Technically you can manually edit the path of an exclusion, and paste the path to the shortcut you want to exclude, however excluding a shortcut in this manner should have absolutely no positive effect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, JeremyNicoll said:

> Maybe this is the reason why an autohotkey shortcut in the startup folder doesn't launch. Have endlessly been puzzling and trying.

Are you sure it doesn't launch?  Or is there a possibility that it launches and (for some reason) stops immediately?

What happens if you navigate to your startup folder and double-click the shortcut?

If that works, look in the Eventlogs (I don't know where they are in Win10) and see how whether AHK's startup is recorded.  Look back in the eventlogs for anything similar at the time you logged on - maybe they'll show AHK start (and stop) or an attempt to start it.

Thanks. I have stopped investigating this any further, spent too much time on it.
Doubleclicking the file will indeed launch it.
Putting any other link in the startup folder will result in that program to be launched, e.g. if I add a shortcut of Wordpad, then Wordpad will be launched, rightfully so.

Re-installed a few times, etc. 
Finally gave up.

Thanks anyway.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

GT500: thanks for the feedback. As for autohotkey : I dropped that - it doesn't work for some unknown reason, see my other post.

As for Windows Defender: noted that it is not Emsisoft,  but Windows itself that should disable Defender once another AV product is running.
I didn't know that.
That said, if things are correct than either EAM or Defender should be active, not both. It would then roughly be the same as with MBAM
i.e. not recommended to have to engines active at the same time(?)

I tried to turn off Windows Defender thru gpedit.msc but it looks that it is still running, along with EAM.

Or maybe this is the correct configuration and I am misinterpreting things?

 

SnagIt-23012018 113708.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, thanks! If this is a 'normal behavior'  then it is fine.
As said, it was recommended to uninstall a 2nd AV product (like MBAM) because of possible conflicts, which I did,
but Windows own AV product side by side with a 3rd party AV product is a bit difficult to reconcile... :-)
Seems 'disabling' thru gpedit.msc even isn't possible... :-)

Anyway, thanks again.

-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, emwul64 said:

That said, if things are correct than either EAM or Defender should be active, not both.

They should both be running, however protection should only be turned on in one of them.

 

8 hours ago, emwul64 said:

As said, it was recommended to uninstall a 2nd AV product (like MBAM) because of possible conflicts, which I did,
but Windows own AV product side by side with a 3rd party AV product is a bit difficult to reconcile... :-)

In the case of Windows Defender, since Microsoft intends for it to always stay running on Windows 10, we account for that when designing and testing our products on Windows 10.

 

8 hours ago, emwul64 said:

Seems 'disabling' thru gpedit.msc even isn't possible... :-)

Microsoft keeps changing how you disable Windows Defender (more than likely to turn it back on for anyone who had disabled it for compatibility reasons in the past). I think it's possible to set the service it uses to Disabled (or something like that) to prevent it from running, however this isn't necessary, and Windows Update may re-enable the service later on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...