andrewek

Tcpip.sys driver and EAM

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Hello all!

One common cause of BSoD is a problem with the tcpip system driver.

To solve this problem, they recommend resetting the protocol settings, updating the network card driver, checking the integrity of system files.

And in last place - the recommendation to disable third-party antivirus, especially on Windows 10.

It is reported that some antivirus products tend to conflict with the tcpip.sys driver.

Unfortunately, all sources are in Russian)

My question is: can EAM cause such a conflict and, as a result, BSoD?

 

p.s. I personally encountered this situation when I just watched a video in a browser on the Internet.

I performed all the recommended actions - except, of course, disabling and removing EAM😉

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There is always the possibility that anti-virus software can interfere with an update.  Disabling the AV should be that last thing you do and only as a last resort.  Anybody who suggests disabling the AV before installing the update is covering the fact that their coders write crappy code, that will trigger an AV because, well it is crappy code.

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Hello!

Thanks for the answer!
But we are not talking about installing updates!😮
This is the computer's normal operation!

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All of what you describe can be done without disabling the AV.  If disabling the AV is necessary because it trips on the driver, then were right back to my original statement.  The problem is no the AV but the buggy driver and crappy coding.  The advice to disable the AV is outdated and simply irresponsible of the party making the recommendation.  Companies resort to that type of recommendation because they are too lazy to chase down the offending code and fix their code base.

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45 minutes ago, andrewek said:

And can EAM cause a conflict with the tcpip driver?

Not that I'm aware of, however if you can start the computer from a bootable disk you can try renaming eppwfp.sys in the Emsisoft Anti-Malware folder, and see if the computer can boot after that.

Do not rename or delete the entire Emsisoft Anti-Malware folder. Your computer will fail to boot if it can't load the EPPDISK driver (although it would show a different exception on the BSoD).

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Hi!

Thanks!

I do not need the actions you have proposed! My computer boots up normally and works without problems! Windows Updates (Tuesday Patches) have been successfully installed!
BSoD was two days ago, the system rebooted and everything is working fine for today!😉
How do you explain my question ....
I saw that the reason is in the driver tcpip.sys.
I read on the Internet that the cause of the conflict could be an antivirus.
So I asked if the conflict between EAM and the tcpip driver could cause BSoD?
 
Because I seemed to rule out all other possible causes of the crash)

2020-01-15 13_56_20-Монитор стабильности системы.jpg
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2020-01-13 09_32_54-Сведения о проблеме.jpg
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21 hours ago, andrewek said:
How do you explain my question ....
I saw that the reason is in the driver tcpip.sys.
I read on the Internet that the cause of the conflict could be an antivirus.
So I asked if the conflict between EAM and the tcpip driver could cause BSoD?

It's not possible to know for certain what caused it without a memory dump. It may be safe to assume that the issue more than likely originated in another driver, which caused a fault in tcpip.sys and thus a BSoD, however there's no way to say for certain.

I would believe the assumption that Anti-Virus causes such BSoD's is based on the fact that most of them use some sort of network filter driver, however Anti-Virus is not the only software that loads drivers related to networking, and it could be an issue with any such software.

Keep in mind that tcpip.sys is a vital part of the Windows Operating System, and has been for a long time. If a build of Emsisoft Anti-Malware had such a serious compatibility issue, it would never pass through QA.

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Hello!

Thanks Arthur!
Now I heard exactly what I wanted!
 
So, I can only wait for the next crash (BSoD) so far to look through the journal  (Memory Dump) and find out the reason?
No more action to take?
By the way - is there enough mini-Dump or do you need a full memory dump?

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23 hours ago, andrewek said:

By the way - is there enough mini-Dump or do you need a full memory dump?

Full/complete memory dumps are always preferred when dealing with a BSoD. Sometimes minidumps are OK, however there are plenty of times where they don't contain enough information to be certain about what happened.

 

23 hours ago, andrewek said:
So, I can only wait for the next crash (BSoD) so far to look through the journal  (Memory Dump) and find out the reason?
No more action to take?

Correct.

When you do have a memory dump for us, I recommend encrypting it when you ZIP it (or RAR or 7z if you prefer), and send me the password in a private message. It will, after all, contain everything that was in memory when the computer crashed.

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