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Lode

Password Protection

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Hi!

I have 2 questions:

I understand one can use password protection to prevent someone using one's pc to change OA settings.

1. But could that also be utilized to prevent a hacker or cracker from making changes to disable enough of OA to do his thing?

I still don't understand the settings of a password for OA. It gives 2 options (I translate from my Dutch version):

A. Enable automatic protection.

B. Lock GUI.

2. What exactly does each of these options do?

I had a severe cracker problem on my laptop some time ago, and I imagine that somehow the settings of my OA were tampered with by the culprit.

I posted about the problem I had then: "Some Russian guests on my laptop...": http://support.online-armor.com/showthread.php?t=12735&highlight=Lode

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"Lock GUI now" (the option you refer to as "Lock GUI) will prevents anyone from accessing the Online Armor Control Panel and changing your settings without the password. With the GUI locked, all pop-ups will be supressed, automatically Blocking all actions that you would otherwise be prompted for.

"Enable GUI autolock" (the option you refer to as "Enable automatic protection") allows you to choose whether Online Armor will be automatically locked after a few minutes of inactivity to ensure that it is not accidentally left unlocked if you must step away from the computer.

If you have reason to believe that someone has gained unauthorised access to your computer though, I'd suggest you visit the Malware Removal section of the forum and seek help with this from a malware removal expert. If the machine itself isn't clean, you can add all the security in the world and it won't make much difference until you get it clean first :) I have no idea if this is the case here, but if you are worried, it's best to get it checked.

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Thank you.

I have no malware on my laptop as far as I know, nor according to my av and anti-spyware scanners. Everything works fast and normal.

I was thinking that with password protection it would be even more hacker-safe. But I guess if a hacker or cracker would enter and begin to change OA settings -or even disable OA- I would somehow see it.

Still password protection might not be a bad idea. It's just that I would still have to be able to see popups, and then use my password to allow or block the action.

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Still password protection might not be a bad idea. It's just that I would still have to be able to see popups, and then use my password to allow or block the action.

Yeah, unfortunately it doesn't work that way. The GUI needs to be unlocked before any popups will be displayed otherwise there would be nothing to stop the popups being answered by someone else while it was locked.

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Yeah, unfortunately it doesn't work that way. The GUI needs to be unlocked before any popups will be displayed otherwise there would be nothing to stop the popups being answered by someone else while it was locked.

Would be interesting to see this as a potential future option, kind of like what Linux does. IE a program wants to install and you get prompted to enter a password prior to allowing or blocking it.

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Would be interesting to see this as a potential future option, kind of like what Linux does. IE a program wants to install and you get prompted to enter a password prior to allowing or blocking it.

Exactly. I brought this topic up because I once had something happening on my laptop that in the end only reformatting got rid of. It was partly my fault:

I had gone to Windows' update site unsandboxed not to let Sandboxie interfere with the downloading/installing of updates, and from there gone to a Russian site -still unsandboxed- to read an article in English. This was my first error.

A few days later my laptop was nearly out of my control. My AV and ASW did nothing to stop it.

But I scanned with SAS and MBAM and they both found a trojan. But instead of letting it be removed I wanted to see if my AV would also find it, and scanned with my top AV (according to AV-Comparatives) and it did not detect it. I scanned again with SAS -nothing found now- and MBAM -same- so I suppose I had prodded it to change itself. So this was my second error.

Even the experts on the original (Dutch) HijackThis forum could not help me get rid of it. The one trying posted that it was a know hacker attack and gave a link to an article about it. But half of the time I could not even go online, receiving error messages. And it would take minutes to move the scroll bar or save a document. In the mean time my screen would blink off for a second once every minute.

The OA IP monitor showed tons of connections to the Russian Republic. And as soon as I blocked them as fast as I could, new connections were made.

So I wondered if this would have happened if OA had password protection for new installations and settings or something like that... I still don't understand how this could have taken place. But that's old water under the bridge now.

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