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Gib

Everything is gone

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I went to get the laptop back Thursday and I was told it couldn't be fixed becausen the hard drive is corrupted. I was told also that he can take care of that too, but it would cost me more, right now I'm just waiting until I get some extra money. I did however buy a flash drive and a pack of blank cds, All I need now is access to a computer so that I can make this disk!

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Yeah, computer repair places like to charge you for every little thing they do. You could probably just run chkdsk to fix it.

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Wait a minute, good idea. I'll let you know how it goes, btw, I can only get to the desktop right now through safe mode /w networking, so I hope I don't get an error message!

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Wait a minute, good idea. I'll let you know how it goes, btw, I can only get to the desktop right now through safe mode /w networking, so I hope I don't get an error message!

You can also run a chkdsk from the Command Prompt in the Recovery Environment. ;)

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Ok, I was able to get 'chkdsk' running from command prompt, before I tried chkdsk through (c:) option and the error message said that I couldn't run it while the disk is in use. I was able to get to windows and it gave me the same message. When I ran chkdsk in command prompt it would tell me what files are incorrect, it would conclude saying "errors found" CHKDSK cannot continue in read-only mode.

About the linux boot disk, I left the library today I wemnt to the site and I put the blank cd in and received a pop-up (a D: pop-up) I chose burn to cd option w/ audio (wmp), I went back and there was a iso download for me to click, but for some reason I felt I didn't need that to burn the fedora to a disk so I left the library, but my question is, my blank cd is still blank?

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When you run chkdsk, you need to provide a "command line parameter" to tell it to fix errors. The command would be something like chkdsk /F C: and that tells it to check for errors on drive C: and fix all errors.

Unless you burned any data to it, or formatted it in any way, then the disk is still blank. In Windows 7, if you save an ISO image on your computer, you can right-click on that ISO image and select to burn it to a CD. Here's some screenshots of what it looks like (click on the screenshots to see larger versions):

Selecting to burn the ISO image to a CD:

This is what the window looks like when it pops up:

Note that no CD burner was found on the system I took that screenshot on. If a CD burner is found on the computer you are using, then it will show the drive letter in the little drop down box labeled "Disk burner". The process should be fairly simple, so let me know if you have any trouble.

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As far as the command prompt this is what I got, "CHKDSK cannot run because the volume is in use by another process. Would you like to schedule this volume to be checked the next time the system re-starts? Y/N"

If I'm to type in y, then when the system restarts nothing happens, I wasn't surprised too much about knowing that theres a way to fix errors from command prompt, I was at first thinking of asking you, fortunately you already told me how to do it.

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Does your computer have a CD burner? If so, then you can click on the Start button, type backup into the search field at the bottom, select Backup and Restore from the search results (should be on top of the list), and click Create a system repair disk in order to create a disk that will load the Recovery Environment when you start your computer up off of it. Running the chkdsk from a bootable disk will ensure that nothing can interfere with it.

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Ok, heres what happened, I went to the start menu and in the search box, I typed in 'backup' and there was Backup and Restore Center.

I'm in safe mode w/ networking, so I clicked on it nothing happened. I rebooted again in safe mode w/networking like before and tried Backup and Restore Center again and nothing happened!

I'm almost certain I have a cd burner, I was told that later laptops have them.

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Does your computer have the following file?

C:\Windows\System32\recdisc.exe

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I did a brief search and found it, yes. I could run as administrator if you want me to. I saw the file, but I didn't get it running yet.

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Yes, go ahead and run it as Administrator, and let me know if that works.

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Quick question, did you want me to insert a blank cd in even though my laptop is messed up?

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Yes. If the infection does not interfere with the process, you'll be able to burn data to the disk.

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Ok, I put my new disk in, but prior to that I labeled it. At first I rebooted to regular windows and was surprised to see all the previous

icons on the desktop and a start menu come alive, I started tasking and then the screen went to bsod, so I rebooted a couple of times then went to safe mode w/ networking, I opened command prompt and had ran chkdsk with the fix and it had given me the same messages as before and chose y for yes, so I restarted to windows and was surprised to see that the desktop had changed...back to the rather deficient look, went to bsod following a task procedure!

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That's not surprising. Until the infection is under control, then you won't be able to use your computer normally.

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I know that if the infection is in there that my computer isn't going to perform normally, I'm saying that from reply #57 those messages I got were the same, only this time I chose "yes" and restarted the computer, but the problem is that it didn't make disk chaeck and repair susceptible at startup.

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OK, insert the disk into the drive, and restart your computer. After the computer starts to power back on, and when you see the manufacturer's logo on the screen, it will say what button to press on your keyboard to access what is often called the Boot Menu. You will most likely need to press this button quickly once you find what button you need to press.

When the Boot Menu opens, it will allow you to select what device to start your computer off of. Some Boot Menus list the CD drives by their model number, and a lot of CD and DVD drives have a model number that starts with the company name "TSSTCorp" or "TSST_Corp". Select your CD/DVD drive and allow the computer to start up off of it. You will be able to load the Command Prompt once it has finished starting up, and then run the chkdsk from there.

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When this laptop starts up with the manufacturers' logo, It flashes so quick that I don't have time to see the bottom of the screen, so I had to reboot a few times in order to see, I also tried to do a screen shot of the beginning logo so that you could see the bottom, but to no avail. I couldn't see anything that says 'Boot Menu', however whenever I reboot from the disk it tells me to press any key to boot from CD/DVD and I pushed the F8 key, then I was taken to the system recovery prompt, I was intrigued but I clicked cancel and restarted the pc, but the news is I couldn't find 'Boot Menu'. Did you want me to <F9> change the boot device order?

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If, after the manufacturer's logo disappears, you see a black screen with the message "PRESS ANY KEY TO BOOT FROM CD/DVD" then that means that your computer is configured to start up off of a CD automatically, and you don't need to use the Boot Menu. Most computers are not configured to work this way, however it makes working with bootable disks much easier when a computer does work this way.

Go ahead and load the recovery environment from the CD again, and then launch the Command Prompt and run the chkdsk /F C: to repair the filesystem on the hard drive.

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Theres finally success with the command line, it conclusively displayed,"Failed to transfer logged messages to the event log with status 50"!

This was done with the command prompt option.

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That's interesting. Are you able to use the System Restore option from the CD?

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I did try system restore option just a minute ago, there was a window that lets me know that its restoring files, but for some reason I had it on and running for a while and it never left the options part nor rebooted.

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It's possible that it was not able to properly read from the System Restore, or that it was not able to write the files to the disk.

Is the Command Prompt still not functioning properly?

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OK, then you will probably have to rely on a Linux boot disk to perform the disk check. A Linux disk that supports the NTFS filesystem will automatically run a check on it if it detects a problem. I would believe they usually require a restart after performing the repairs, however I have not seen how it works on the newer Linux disks with the newer NTFS drivers and newer kernel versions.

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I'm finding that using the librarys computer is a little more difficult than I thought for the (1hr) download. Are you sure that I cannot use my laptop at all for the fedora download?

I did use my laptop to create a repair cd.

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I'm finding that using the librarys computer is a little more difficult than I thought for the (1hr) download. Are you sure that I cannot use my laptop at all for the fedora download?

I did use my laptop to create a repair cd.

You should be able to use any computer with Internet access and a working CD burner.

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Ok, I've just burned it to a disk (KDE), but I have two questions. Do I click on that icon to install it to the hard drive and whats the way of getting to command prompt, I saw something that said "show........emulator"!

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I recommend that you avoid installing to the hard drive (at least until you have had a chance to recover the data from your computer). There should be a link on the desktop that says Computer or My Computer and you should be able to access your computer's hard drive through there. When you connect your USB drive, it will show up on the desktop as a separate icon and it will show up in My Computer. You should be able to copy and paste data from your computer's hard drive to your USB flash drive in a manner very similar to how it works on Windows.

The command prompt on Linux is usually referred to as the Terminal (or, in more technical terms, as a terminal emulator) or as the Console. You don't actually need to use that right now, and I would recommend avoiding the command prompt in Linux unless you know exactly what you need to type in. The Linux console/terminal/etc. tends to be a little less restricting than the one in Windows, and you can do some pretty incredible things in it, so it is really easy to get in to trouble with it. ;)

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OK if you want to try and run a disk check from the Fedora boot disk, there here's some instructions. Please note that this will be quite a bit different from Windows, it may be confusing, and it will probably seem a bit tedious. Linux does not assign letters to hard drives like Windows does, so the names of the drives may seem a bit odd if you aren't used to Linux. Also note that I'm going to try to use as many screenshots as possible to illustrate the process, and if they are too small to see or read properly, then you can click on them to see a larger version.

After starting your computer up off of the Fedora 16 KDE disk, your desktop should look like this:

fedora_16_kde_desktop.png

The first step will be to find out what device name Linux has assigned to your hard drive. To do this, you will need to open KDE's equivalent of the "Start Menu", which is usually called the Application Launcher. Go ahead and click on the little blue icon in the lower-left corner of the screen that looks like the Fedora logo:

fedora_16_kde_diskcheck_instructions_001.png

When the Application Launcher opens, you will want to click on File Manager to open it:

fedora_16_kde_diskcheck_instructions_002.png

In the File Manager, on the left side, is a list of folders that you can quickly navigate to. Your hard drive should be at the bottom of that list, sort of like the screenshot below (note that the one is my example is listed as 60GiB in size, which is close to 60GB):

fedora_16_kde_diskcheck_instructions_003.png

Go ahead and click on that icon for your hard drive (you may see a message asking for a password pop up and then disappear, but don't worry about it, you don't need to enter a password for this to work), and the File Manage will ask the system to mount your hard drive. Once it is mounted, the File Manager will refresh to show you the contents of your hard drive, sort of like in the screenshot below:

fedora_16_kde_diskcheck_instructions_004.png

Once you see your hard drive's files, go ahead and open the Application Launcher again, and this move your mouse over Applications at the bottom (like in the screenshot below) in order to switch to the Applications list:

fedora_16_kde_diskcheck_instructions_005.png

Now click on System in the Applications list to view System applications:

fedora_16_kde_diskcheck_instructions_006.png

Scroll down and click on View Disk Usage:

fedora_16_kde_diskcheck_instructions_007.png

You will see a window similar to the one in the screenshot below (I resized mine before taking the screenshot in order to make it easier to read the information, and you may want to do the same as well):

fedora_16_kde_diskcheck_instructions_008.png

In my screenshot, the 60GiB drive listed is /dev/sda1 (note that it lists the sizes as GiB and not GB), so we know that it is the hard drive we are looking for. I have highlighted that hard drive in the screenshot below to make it easier to see:

fedora_16_kde_diskcheck_instructions_009.png

Theoretically, you should now know the name that Linux has assigned to your hard drive. There are other ways to get this information, and other ways that would have been easier, however it is important to note that in following those steps above you also learned some basics about the KDE desktop that you will need to know in order to copy your data to your flash drive. ;)

Make sure that you make a note of your hard drive's name, and then close the View Disk Usage program (which you may have noticed is also called KDiskFree).

Now you should still have the File Manager open from earlier. If you do not, then please go back to the Application Launcher and open the File Manager again. You will need to right click on your hard drive, and select to Unmount it (sort of like in the screenshot below). Note that your files will disappear after you do this, however nothing has actually happened to them, it just means that the File Manager is no longer reading your hard drive (this is important when running the disk check):

fedora_16_kde_diskcheck_instructions_010.png

You can close the File Manager now, as you will not need it during the disk check.

Go back to the Application Launcher, go to Applications again, and then click on System again. This time, open the Terminal. There are two of them, one is Konsole and the other is XTerm. Please open Konsole (I have highlighted it in the screenshot below), as my instructions will be for Konsole and not for XTerm:

fedora_16_kde_diskcheck_instructions_011.png

Type su - into the terminal (note that the space and the dash are very important) and then press Enter on your keyboard. After doing that, you should see exactly what is shown in the screenshot below:

fedora_16_kde_diskcheck_instructions_012.png

Now you can run your disk check. The command is ntfsck and you will need to specify your hard drive's name as well. In my example above, the hard drive name was /dev/sda1 so the command I will use to start the disk check will be ntfsck /dev/sda1 (if your hard drive had a different name, then simply fill in the name of your hard drive after the ntfsck command when you type it in, similarly to my example). Here's a screenshot of the Terminal after running ntfsck:

fedora_16_kde_diskcheck_instructions_013.png

There are no options for ntfsck, so if it doesn't ask you if you want to fix anything then just assume that it did fix any errors and restart the computer (you can find the Restart option in the Application Launcher under Leave). You should be OK to copy your data to your flash drive once it has finished restarting. You'll want to use the File Manager, and you will be able to access both your hard drive and your Flash drive from the menu on the left, just like I showed you in the instructions above.

Edit: Oh, and before I forget! By default, KDE's File Manager is single-click sort of like MacOS. This means that when you click on a folder or file, it will open, as opposed to a double-click in Windows. In order to select files and folders, when you hold your mouse over them you will see a little green plus icon that you can click to select the file, and when you hold your mouse over a file or folder that is selected then you will see a little red minus icon that you can click to unselect it. Note that you can also click and drag to draw a box, like in Windows, to select more than one file or folder at a time.

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Good stuff,lol, it does take some getting used to, I do like it. However I've been searching for a long time in regards to the name. I assume that just like in windows you have to download java and adobe flash player as well.

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I don't see it in that list either. Please go back to the File Manager, click on your hard drive in the list on the left, and take a screenshot of it for me.

As for Java, you don't need to install it, as most Linux distributions come with an open source implementation of Java. Adobe Flash is another matter, and needs to be installed separately, however with Red Hat based distributions such as Fedora it is possible to set up Adobe's repository for YUM (Yellowdog Updater, Modified) which allows the Adobe Flash package to be downloaded and updated by Fedora's package manager and updater. Installing and managing software on Fedora is another matter entirely, so I won't go into that at the moment (especially since you would need to install Fedora onto your computer in order to install and remove software).

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Ok, here it is! BTW, is it supposed to always have the text "Attached Thumbnails" above the screenshot?

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Yes, it does that for every attachment that you don't click the "Add To Post" link for.

It looks like you right-clicked on your hard drive. Did you try left-clicking on it?

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OK, that looks right. Now proceed with the "View Disk Usage" thing and see if you can find the hard drive's name.

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Ok, I'm showing two screenshots one that exemplifies success and the other that exemplifies failure.

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You'll want to use this command: ntfsck /dev/sda1

My apologies if I got that wrong in my instructions. ;)

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No, you didn't get it wrong, I actually forgot about the "ck" ending, lol, hold on. Lets try this again :)

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Sorry, I made that mistake. Heres another screenshot, It happened so fast, but I think you mentioned something like, it isn't gong to indicate anything but just finish.

I don't know whats wrong. When I saved snapshot7 I put it in pictures folder with the rest, but when I clicked "browse", I didn't see it in the pictures folder, so I put the ss in the documents folder and there it was!

Hold on!

Edited by Gib

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Yeah, that looks like it did in my example, so it should be OK.

Go ahead and insert your Flash drive into one of the USB ports, and then use the File Manager to access your hard drive and copy your files to the Flash drive.

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